Online saxophone, flute, clarinet, music theory, and music improvisation, lessons with Stephen Kammerer at LessonFace.com.

Stephan Kammerer

Category Names: 
Flute, Saxophone, Alto Sax, Tenor Sax, Clarinet
Featured Teacher on Lessonface Since August 2013
Teachers featured on Lessonface are vetted by the Lessonface staff, a process which includes ensuring the teacher meets our qualifications for teaching experience, a meet and greet session online, and, for teachers based in the US, a background check that at the least includes a check of the sex offender registry.

Price per lesson
More pricing options and any discounts available for booking multiple lessons will be displayed on the payment page.

From: $40.00 / 30 Minutes
To: $75.00 / 60 Minutes

Book a Lesson with Stephan Kammerer

$40.00

About

Cutting his teeth on the road with Maynard Ferguson and the Artie Shaw Orchestra Danish saxophonist Stephan Kammerer has made his career in the United States. A scholarship brought him to Berklee College of Music in 1993. After graduating with honors Stephan has lived in New York City since 2001 where he currently lives with his wife and daughter maintaining a busy performing schedule, teaching saxophone, composing music and working on saxophone mouthpieces. Stephan also leads his own quartet featuring John Chin on Piano, Matt Clohesy on bass and Mark Ferber on drums. Since 2008 Stephan has co-led the group JKIQ with the Danish bass player Jens Jefsen, that also featured Marc Ayza on drums and John Chin on piano.

"Stephan teaches in a systematic manner, starting from my level of competence. He has been quick to identify and correct problem areas with my playing. During this short time, I have improved in my playing as well as developed a better understanding and knowledge in the many aspects of jazz".

- Paul Foo, Singapore (online student)

My teaching style is based on your own goals for your playing, and the different aspects of practice and performance: 

How to create measurable results for your playing that align with what you want for yourself and your playing.

When to be conceptual, and how to get to where the music just flows.

How to practice effectively

How to perform effectively

Some of the things to work on are:

Form/technique, and how that is directly going to help free your playing and expression to a higher level.

How to use different improvisational concepts like motive playing, bebop scales, pentatonics, chromatic approach, etc.

How to create your own voice.

How to work with melodic target notes to create a stronger sense of intention in your playing.

Time, articulation, feel, rythmic expression and placement.

- Stephan Kammerer